Share:

Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018

HR 1625 : To amend the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to include severe forms of trafficking in persons within the definition of transnational organized crime for purposes of the rewards program of the Department of State, and for other purposes.

STATUS

Referred to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. March 20, 2017

Ordered to be Reported by Voice Vote. May 3, 2017

Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held. May 3, 2017

Considered under suspension of the rules. (consideration: CR H4411-4414) May 22, 2017

Mr. Royce (CA) moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. May 22, 2017

On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H4411-4412) May 22, 2017

Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. May 22, 2017

DEBATE - The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1625. May 22, 2017

Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. May 23, 2017

Committee on Foreign Relations. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the nature of a substitute favorably. February 7, 2018

Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 311. February 12, 2018

Committee on Foreign Relations. Reported by Senator Corker with an amendment in the nature of a substitute. Without written report. February 12, 2018

Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR H1291) February 28, 2018

Message on Senate action sent to the House. March 1, 2018

Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to Senate Committee on Appropriations the House message to accompany H.R. 1625 with instructions to report back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 2219) made in Senate. March 22, 2018

Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 with an amendment (SA 2217) made in Senate. March 22, 2018

Cloture motion on the motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 presented in Senate. (CR S1919) March 22, 2018

Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 made in Senate. (CR S1919) March 22, 2018

Measure laid before Senate by unanimous consent. (consideration: CR S1919-1931) March 22, 2018

Message on House action received in Senate and at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment. March 22, 2018

Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 796 Reported to House. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions. The resolution makes in order a motion offered by the chair of the Committee on Appropriations or his designee that the House concur in the Senate amendment with an amendment to H.R. 1625 consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 115-66. The resolution also provides for proceedings during the period from March 23, 2018 through April 9, 2018 March 22, 2018

Rule H. Res. 796 passed House. March 22, 2018

Mr. Frelinghuysen moved that the House agree with an amendment to the Senate amendment. March 22, 2018

The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule. March 22, 2018

On motion that the House agree with an amendment to the Senate amendment. Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 256 - 167 (Roll no. 127). (text of House amendment to Senate amendment: CR H1769-2016) March 22, 2018

Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection. March 22, 2018

DEBATE - The House proceeded with further debate on the motion that the House agree to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 with an amendment. March 22, 2018

DEBATE - Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 796, the House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on the motion that the House agree in the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 with an amendment. March 22, 2018

Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 796, Mr. Frelinghuysen brought up H.R. 1625 and offered a motion. (consideration: CR H1769-2027) March 22, 2018

Message on Senate action sent to the House. March 23, 2018

Senate agreed to the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 by Yea-Nay Vote. 65 - 32. Record Vote Number: 63. March 23, 2018

Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 with an amendment (SA 2217) withdrawn in Senate. March 23, 2018

Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to Senate Committee on Appropriations the House message to accompany H.R. 1625 with instructions to report back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 2219) fell when cloture invoked on the motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 in Senate. March 23, 2018

Cloture on the motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1625 invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 67 - 30. Record Vote Number: 62. March 23, 2018

Presented to President. March 23, 2018

Read the Official Bill Text

Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018

Omnibus spending bill for FY2018

Congress funded 21st Century Community Learning Centers $20 million above the FY2017 level, increasing available funding to $1.21 billion—a win for children, families and the country. The proposed increase means doors to quality local afterschool and summer learning programs will stay open for 1.6 million students and families. Additionally, it will make programs available for 20,000 of the 19.4 million students currently waiting for access.

This funding level increase is especially noteworthy following President Trump’s proposal to eliminate the program in both the FY2018 and FY2019 budget proposals, which drove friends of afterschool to reach out to Congress with more than 103,000 calls and emails since January 2017, energized supporters to turn out at town halls in their communities, and prompted more than 600 local, state, and national organizations to sign a letter in support of Community Learning Centers sent to Congress last week. Champions of the program on Capitol Hill showed strong support for Community Learning Centers as well, with 111 members of the House coming together across party lines and signing a letter in support of the program earlier this week. A huge thank-you to all who worked so hard in support of Community Learning Center funds.

Other funding streams that can be used to support afterschool and summer learning programs were largely supported in the proposed omnibus:

  • Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG): $2.37 billion increase up to about $5.3 billion. About 45 percent of children served through CCDBG are provided with school-age afterschool care. This funding builds on the consistent funding increases in recent years to help states implement quality improvement reforms in the CCDBG Act of 2014 and will dramatically improve access to quality care for many families.
  • Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS): AmeriCorps State and National Grants were funded at $412.010 million, an increase of $25 million. VISTA was funded at last year’s level of $92.364 million. AmeriCorps and VISTA positons are often  used in support of afterschool programs.
  • Full Service Community Schools: $17.5 million, a $7.5 million increase over last year’s funding. FSCS grants support community schools and often leverage afterschool and summer learning supports.
  • Title I of Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA): $15.76 billion, a $300 million increase above FY2016. Title I funds can be used to support school district-provided afterschool and summer learning programs.
  • Title II of ESSA: $2.056 billion, level with last year, had been proposed for elimination by President and in the House spending bill. Funds support effective instruction state grants, teacher/educator training and professional development.
  • Title IV Part A of ESSA, Student Support Academic Enrichment Grants: $1.1 billion which is a $700 million increase over fiscal year 2017, to make these flexible resources available to States, which can include assisting in protecting students and educators.  Afterschool STEM is an allowable use of the grants, as are physical education, community school coordinators, and a wide range of mental health supports and education technology.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF): The legislation funds NSF at $7.8 billion–$300 million above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. NSF targets funding to programs that foster innovation and U.S. economic competitiveness, including funding for research on advanced manufacturing, physics, mathematics, cybersecurity, neuroscience and STEM education. The Education and Human Resources division was funded at $902 million including $62.5 million for advancing informal STEM learning. 
  • Youth Mentoring Initiative: $94 million increased by $14 million from FY2017. These grants funds support mentoring initiatives for young people in and out of school. 
  • Perkins/Career Technical Education: Funded at $1.193 billion, an increase of $75 million, to support older youth career and workforce readiness education.  
  • CDC School Health: Funded at $15.4 million, funds used to support staff professional development and training for obesity prevention and health in both school and out-of-school time.
  • Opioid Abuse Treatment and Reduction: $1 billion in new funding for grants to States and Indian tribes to address the opioid epidemic. $476 million (+$350 million) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to support increased opioid overdose surveillance and prevention activities at the national, state, and local level. At least $500 million in research on opioid addiction supported by the National Institutes of Health. $130 million for the Rural Communities Opioid Response program, aimed to reach hard-hit rural America and target the unique issues associated with substance use disorder in rural areas.?
  • Child Protection Improvement Act: Establishes a voluntary national criminal history background check system and criminal history review program for organizations that serve children, the elderly, and individuals with disabilities, including afterschool programs.